Top 6 hydrating fruits for Ramadan

What a blessed time of year when the glorious month of Ramadan connects with this sweet summer season. All this heat though, will tire us out quicker in fasting season.

The recommended amount of drinking water is 8-10 glasses per day. In Ramadan it will be a digestive challenge to drink vast amounts in short periods, particularly after breaking the fast. 

Top up your water shortage by eating these 6 juicy fruits per meal for bursts of energy.

1. Watermelon

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Blend watermelon chunks with ice and coconut palm sugar for a light Iftaar dessert.

Hydration rating 92%. As this fruit is mostly water and sugar it’s packed with essential rehydration salts magnesium, calcium, sodium and potassium so it can actually hydrate you more effectively than water.

 

2. Oranges

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Squeeze fresh orange juice into chocolate drinks and cut up segments into fruit salads.

Hydration rating 87% water. Oranges are sweet and packed with more than 100% of the daily recommended value for vitamin C.

 

3. Berries

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Eat berries with cereal for Suhoor (morning meal) or as a parfait with yoghurt and granola.

Strawberries rank as the 4th strongest antioxidant fruit and are made up of 92% water. Raspberries and blueberries are also at their peak during the summer. Full of vitamin C, berries are known to clear the arteries, regulate blood sugar and taste awesome. Go for organic, eat a handful each day.

 

4. Figs

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Slice fruits with coconut milk ice cream/Kulfi, blend into a fig smoothie or make a fig chutney with some medjool dates for breaking the fast each day.

Known as At-Teen in the Qur’an, these summer beauties are indulgent fudgy fruits with a high-output on the health scale. They’re known to lower blood pressure, improve digestion, help with weight loss; even the leaves of the fig tree lower the insulin required by diabetics.

 

5. Grapes

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Slice into fruit salads or just eat whole. One particular mix-up is eating a single grape with a morsel of cheese and sprinkling of coffee granules. Sounds weird but tastes gooood!

These hydration gems are known for their extremely high content of Resveratrol, a substance that acts as an antioxidant and is heart-friendly. Bursting water with each bite, take your pick from purple, red, black or green. One of summer’s most delicious fruits.

 

6. Grapefruit

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Pan fry segments to caramalise grapefruit and eat with waffles. Cut a fruit in half, sprinkle with fairtrade sugar and scoop to eat with a spoon. *Warning, do not get into eyes. Ow.

Hydration rating 90% water. Sweet but zingy, grapefruits contain only 30 calories and the detoxifying limonoids, which according to research, may inhibit cancer tumours.

Have something to add to this post? Share it in the comments.

 

RAMADAN With MARRIOTT

Experience the true essence of the Holy Month at COUNTER CULTURE CAFE, set on the ground level of Dubai Marriott Harbour Hotel & Suites. Complete with an extensive Iftar buffet ranging from Middle Eastern treats to Indian Sub-Continent specialties, enjoy an interactive open kitchen and an elaborate dessert buffet. A tempting range of a la carte options is available for Suhoor.

AED 99 per person for Iftar (food only), from sunset to 8.30pm
Free for children below 6 years old
Suhoor is served a la carte from 9pm to 3am
Reservations are required, Call +971 4 319 4786

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6 refreshing drinks to relish, this Ramadan

Refreshing drinks plays a big role in celebrating Ramadan, with specialty dishes and drinks served during the Muslim fasting month.

Drinks like Jellab, Amar al-Deen and Tamar Hindi are essential during the holy month. Fasters want to refill their body’s water levels after long hours of fasting. Sweets are considered part of reviving Ramadan traditions.

There are traditional drinks considered an integral part of a Ramadan meal. These are the top 6.

 

1. Amar Al Deen

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Amar al Deen or Amar Addeen is a combination of two words in Arabic: Amar (moon) al Deen (the religion). Amar al Deen is made from sheets of dried compressed apricot. In order to prepare the Apricot Drink Sharab. the apricot sheets should be soaked for several hours. It is customary to serve the drink at Iftar during the Holy month of Ramadan as it is refreshing

The best Amar Al Deen, or the dry apricot sheets come from Syria, which is a major producer for this type of product.

 

2. Tamar Hindi

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Tamar Hindi, or Tamarind, is a sour chilled drink usually sold throughout the year in several Arab countries.The drink is a sour-sweet combination, so it is better to add a dash of rose syrup for an extra drop of sweetness.

Tamar Hindi was the name given to the tamarind fruit by Arabs, the name literally translates to ‘Indian dates’.

 

3. Jellab

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Jellab is a very popular drink in the Middle East. It’s made by diluting the syrup made of grape molasses, dates and rose water with water and serving it in a tall glass with crushed ice.

The best part about it is the heap of pine nuts and golden raisins that are so much fun to fish out from the bottom of the glass with your straw!

 

4. Karkadeh

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Refreshing hot or cold with a color that is as intense as the flavor, Karkadeh is a sweet infusion made from hibiscus flower.

Karkadeh, which is a typical Ramadan drink, is also served for other occasions such as weddings.With a hearty Iftar meal the cold version is preferred.

 

5. Kharoub

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Carob juice, also known as Kharoub, is a traditional Egyptian drink, that is usually made during the Islamic month of Ramadan, made from carob molasses. Carob juice, which can be used to make sugar as well, gives the feeling of drinking a glass of thin honey.

The healthy and refreshing drink is full of fiber, protein and antioxidants, that helps Muslims go through the long hours of fasting.

 

6. Erk Soos

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Extract of the licorice plant are mixed with water to make this drink that is served in Egypt and the Levant (Jordan, Lebanon, Palestine and Syria).

The process of making it involves put the ground roots in a muslin cloth and drop water over it drop by drop all night long. As you can see it is complicated and time consuming so no body makes that at home.

Have something to add to this post? Share it in the comments.

 

RAMADAN With MARRIOTT

Experience the true essence of the Holy Month at COUNTER CULTURE CAFE, set on the ground level of Dubai Marriott Harbour Hotel & Suites. Complete with an extensive Iftar buffet ranging from Middle Eastern treats to Indian Sub-Continent specialties, enjoy an interactive open kitchen and an elaborate dessert buffet. A tempting range of a la carte options is available for Suhoor.

AED 99 per person for Iftar (food only), from sunset to 8.30pm
Free for children below 6 years old
Suhoor is served a la carte from 9pm to 3am
Reservations are required, Call +971 4 319 4786

5 Tips to help your fasting, this Ramadan

Ramadan is the one of the most predictable events of the Islamic year, yet it takes us by surprise every single time. And before we know it, our bodies are struggling with the first day of fasting. Being low on sugar, caffeine or nicotine is never a fun way to start the holy month.

Well before Ramadan starts , you can start planning ahead and coaching your body to cope with the routine fasting. 

Here are 5 tips for before and during Ramadan to ensure you are never drained of energy.

1. Ditch the Addictions

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Everyone has that yearning in the morning when you unconsciously reach out for the coffee jar, then stop half way because it’s the first day of Ramadan.

To avoid the sudden shortage and withdrawal of caffeine, start by reducing the number of cups your drink per day, and increase the hours between each. Also try to avoid drinking coffee once you wake, and increase the time you give yourself before the first cup of coffee.

The same rules apply for nicotine addiction – if you try weaning yourself slowly off shisha or cigarettes now, you’ll be better come Ramadan.

 

2. Move often

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One great way to stay focused and energized without having to eat or drink coffee is by moving. So make sure that every hour, you spend at least five minutes moving. Take a walk around the office or stretch at your desk. It will help you pump blood through your body, and you’ll get a fine boost to help you through the day.

Just make sure you don’t engage in exhausting exercise, or you will get thirsty.

 

3. Stay hydrated

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This may sound silly, because how can you stay hydrated if you can’t drink water all day long, right? Wrong.

You can make sure you’re well hydrated by eating foods, especially fruits, that are rich in juices when you break your fast or before you start your fast.

Also, it’s very important to make it a habit to reach out for water instead of sodas and coffee post iftar, which won’t really quench your thirst.

 

4. Eat foods that take longer to digest

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Since you won’t be eating for a while, you want to make sure you have enough nutrients lingering in your body for as long as possible. That’s why it’s important to include complex carbohydrates into your meals, especially at the Suhoor (predawn meal). This will help to release energy throughout the day.

 

5. Eat consciously

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With regular meals turned into huge feasts, a lot of people tend to eat much more than their body actually needs. Let alone the kind of foods they stuff their bellies with …

Avoid deep fried foods as much as possible, and limit your use of salt.

Have something to add to this story? Share it in the comments.

 

RAMADAN With MARRIOTT

Experience the true essence of the Holy Month at COUNTER CULTURE CAFE, set on the ground level of Dubai Marriott Harbour Hotel & Suites. Complete with an extensive Iftar buffet ranging from Middle Eastern treats to Indian Sub-Continent specialties, enjoy an interactive open kitchen and an elaborate dessert buffet. A tempting range of a la carte options is available for Suhoor.

AED 99 per person for Iftar (food only), from sunset to 8.30pm
Free for children below 6 years old
Suhoor is served a la carte from 9pm to 3am
Reservations are required, Call +971 4 319 4786

5 Mistakes to Avoid When Doing Business in Dubai

You’re heading to Dubai on business? That’s no surprise: The city rocketed onto the list of the top five most robust economies in the world last year, and it’s considered one of the Middle East’s most cosmopolitan cities.But Islamic influence makes doing business in the City of Gold a bit more nuanced than in, say, the City of Light.

SKETCH MARRIOT DUBAI BUSSINESS

 

Here are some of the most common professional pitfalls — and how to avoid them.

 

1. Swashbuckling

Your hard-charging, Type A alter ego should be benched. Meetings here move at a slower pace, with manners and courtesy making the most impact on your hosts. Graciously accept the refreshments you’re offered, which might include cardamom-infused coffee or a puff from the shisha, or hookah. Embrace the culture and let patience be your guide.

Do: Stand when any guest — of either gender — joins the meeting. And in Dubai, your word is your bond. If you agree to terms — even verbally — be prepared to deliver on what you’ve promised.

 

2. *&#@&!!!

Arabs love good banter as much as the next person. But profanity is uber-offensive in the Muslim world, so save your R-rated repertoire for your bar buddies back home. You could be fined and jailed for offensive language and gestures. And avoid dishing disparaging views of Islamic culture — you could be fined, jailed or deported.

Do: Impress your hosts by learning the Arabic phrase assalaamu alaikum (“peace be upon you”). You’ll hear this often, and you’ll discover that it’s a nice alternative to “Howdy” and “See ya.”

 

3. Leading with your left

Keep that left hand tucked away when eating, gesturing and glad-handing with your Dubai colleagues. Muslims generally consider the left hand to be unclean.

Do: Let your host initiate handshakes — the usual greeting — and be prepared that handshakes can last a long time. Use only your right hand — covering the handclasp with your left hand won’t be appreciated.

 

4. Eating in public during Ramadan

Visitors during the ninth, and holiest, month on the Islamic calendar will want to make sure they’re respectful of Ramadan’s restrictive customs. (In 2016, the observance will run from June 6 to July 5.) Eating, drinking and smoking — even chewing gum — during the day in public is against the law for Muslims and non-Muslims.

Do: Remember that Muslims are forbidden to drink alcohol. While your Dubai colleagues may have adopted Western habits — many business types went to U.S. universities or have lived in the West — it’s best not to drink unless you’re invited to.

 

5. Worrying too much

Dubai’s population is nearly 90 percent expat, and the business community is comfortable with all kinds of cultures.

Do: Relax! Try your best to respect the Emiratis’ values and avoid the preceding mistakes — but also know that you’re dealing with forgiving folks who understand that their culture is, most likely, pretty foreign to you.

 

 

Original Post by Jordan Bressler/MARRIOTTTRAVELER

Brilliant Stories feat. MOUSTAFA from Housekeeping Dept.

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Our guest Mr. Alaa who is staying with his family in 2506 decided to stay in Dubai for Ramadan, and he mentioned that to Mustafa while they were having a discussion about the Holy month. So, Mustafa provided the guest with few dates along with small bottles of water. He then offered the guest to show him the prayer rooms which are on the 6th floor of the hotel.

He provided him the directions to the mosque closest to the hotel, situated on the Marina Walk and explained to him about the offers that we have for Iftar in The Observatory Restaurant so they could enjoy the Sunset Specials set menu with special prices. He further informed the guest that he could order from Room Service as well since we have special Iftar and Suhoor Menu with extensive traditional Arabic options.

The guest was extremely delighted and thankful for the information provided by Mustafa and he even invited him to have Iftar with them on that day itself.